Roselyn Wilkinson

What Your 2019 Money Goals Should Look Like
April 8 - Sarah Ashlock
Money
 

FIRST THOUGHT: Funny about Money

Why are some of the most important conversations also the hardest to have? As I share with you just how dang important it is to talk about the hard stuff in your careers, to ask for what you need or believe you deserve, I’m trying to do the same. Walking up to your assistant director and asking for a bonus doesn’t need to be awkward. Let’s all remember what’s actually awkward: forgetting your new friend’s name (or never knowing it to begin with); going in for a kiss with a guy and crashing into his teeth, instead; breaking up with the hair stylist you’ve had for a decade. Let’s brave tricky work situations together.

WOMEN IN NUMBERS: 43 Percent

There’s nothing more fear inducing than the “m” word: money. If you’re fortunate enough to say goodbye to living paycheck to paycheck, it can be thrilling—yet also uncomfortable—for you to talk about, or know what to do with it. Investing is an area of finances that can leave the smartest person in the room feeling bewildered. Women are less self-assured than men when it comes to investments, with only 43 percent claiming they feel confident, compared to 56 percent of men.

WOMAN TO WATCH: Roselyn Wilkinson, Certified Financial Planner

One way to avoid financial anxieties is to talk to someone who makes it her job to talk about money: a financial planner. Discussing your financial future with a person who not only knows what she’s talking about, but also doesn’t have emotion tied to it, can guide you toward your goals. Roselyn Wilkinson is a certified financial planner who has tapped into the niche of women’s financial health.

Roselyn has been a finance expert for more than 25 years. Now, she is with MD&A Financial Management, serving as the president. Being a certified financial planner means that Roselyn is licensed to sell all kinds of money goodies (I’m sure that’s the technical term), like stocks, bonds, mutual funds—you name it.

When her book It’s Good to Be Queen came out last year, Roselyn focused on how simple financial planning can be. With the busy woman in mind, Roselyn says that no matter what your situation, whether you’re thrice divorced or happily partnered, your financial future rests solely on you. Don’t be one of those women on Oprah who gets blindsided when the feds walk through the door, y’all.

Now, if you’re thinking, “But I have no money!” Girl, preach. Even still, you don’t need much to start learning how to build your wealth over the next five, 10, 20 years. Roselyn says that financial security is the best way to gain and sustain independence.

Based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Roselyn is active in her community. Volunteer work and membership at organizations like the Heinz Negotiation Academy for Women and the Women & Girls Foundation of Pittsburgh gives Roselyn a chance to share just how important it is to talk about financial security with women today.

So, besides opening your mouth and uttering the words, what specifically can you do to have a more financially fruitful 2019? MD&A offers a few ideas. First, contribute to your retirement plan. Don’t have a retirement plan? No problem: First, figure out your retirement plan, girl! Second, if you plan on giving more than $12,000 to a charity, document your money trail for deductions next year. Third, get yourself a credit report. It’s free every year and can help you identify any problem areas or areas of identity fraud.

As women, we need to get comfortable owning our money so we can conquer the world no matter what life throws at us.

In the dark about your finances? Same. Check out Roselyn Wilkinson’s four tips on how to take control of your financial future by clicking here or heading over to OnTheDotWoman.com!

QUITE THE QUOTE

The 90-year-old Japanese contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama said:

"Since I find a refuge in my work, I cannot be bullied by men."

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